Tiny House Floating Loft

Tiny House Floating Loft

If you’ve been following along in the blog, on my Facebook page, or on my YouTube Channel you know that initially I’d had just a standard loft design that most tiny houses have.  It was big enough for a queen bed and was over the downstairs bed room and bathroom.  However, after looking at the potential wasted space where I might be able to add an extension to this area I started playing around with ideas.

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Initially I’d just extended the loft (check this post for the full breakdown) which was a lot of work on its own.  Today it was time to remove the offending board  so that the extension to the loft wouldn’t need to be supported by the beam running across the opening.  That meant that I’d need to support that overhang some other way.  There are only 3 ways to do so.

Support it from the roof, the floor, or rebuild it out of steel so it needs no support. The last one isn’t an option as I’m not building an aircraft carrier, just a tiny house.  The second one would have been the easiest, plop a post down under the extending corner and attach it to the ground and corner, done.  The problem is that would have then added a post in the middle of the walkway. Since a tiny house or RV are basically just long hallways this is less than ideal. You can see the beam that needed to go in the bottom left of the picture below.

Tiny House Loft Extension

That left only one option, support the loft extension/overhang from the ceiling. This could be done with steel cable and special fittings, wood posts and brackets, or the easiest method, chains.  I opted to go for easy and attached a heavy duty chain (supports up to 2,000+ pounds) from the overhang/extension to the ceiling.  I could have used a standard heavy duty hook but then thought better of it.  What if I’m driving the tiny house down the road and the loft bounces up (causing slack in the chain to happen) and the hook popped off?  Couldn’t have that so I went with something called a Double Clevis Hook (shown below).  That with a heavy duty eye bolt screwed into the piece of wood means its not going anywhere.

Double Clevis Hook

Double Clevis Hook

So the chain, double clevis hook, and eybolts are all perfecto.  But what if the wood I’m attaching to gives out?  This is why I stress so much….So I just did two chains.  It’ll support about 4,000 pounds but really the second chain is just for redundancy.  The spot where the main chain would go required I add a 4×4 in between the studs.  Since I didn’t really want to then support the load all the way down the roof and into the wall I opted to secure it to the selected studs using a couple of heavy duty 3/4″ screws, construction glue, brackets, and metal strapping. I also had to run a wire around it (since I’d already run my wiring) so I created a channel in the beam and laid nail protection over it.

Can you see the paranoia I have shining through yet?  The other backup chain went directly into a stud.  After it went up I cut the offending beam out and then tested it by…well sitting on it.  I bounced around did some pull ups and such.  It isn’t going anywhere.  Enjoy the pics below.

 

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